Remote Workers Are Outperforming Office Workers–Here’s Why

- By : MMEadmin

Have you seen any of these gimmicky office designs? Candy dispensers in conference rooms. Hammocks and indoor treehouses. Tech companies tend to be the worst offenders with the startup favorites: beer taps and table tennis. Maybe there is fun for a moment

You can’t buy Employee Loyalty; You must EARN it!

- By : MMEadmin

Published on July 31, 2018 by Brigette Hyacinth Author: The Future of Leadership: Rise of Automation, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence According to research conducted by Gallup, 75% of workers who voluntarily left their jobs did so because of their bosses

The Most Important Skill For 21st-Century Success

- By : MMEadmin

Originally published on Forbes.com by Kevin H. Johnson Jul 31, 2018, 12:18pm What new skills have you had to pick up so far in your career? What will you need to master next in order to reach your goals? How

Goodbye, Geoffrey

- By : MMEadmin

This article first appeared on ABC News By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO, AP RETAIL WRITER NEW YORK — Jun 28, 2018, 9:06 AM ET Toys R Us is closing its last U.S. stores by Friday, the end of a chain known to generations

Tax tips for 2018

Tax season is fast approaching, with everyone’s employer due to send their W-2s by the end of January. Now is the time to start getting ready to file your taxes.

It’s helpful to be mindful of your taxes throughout the year, which will help you stay organized and avoid scrambling every year when tax season rolls around. Here are 10 ways to get a jump start on your taxes now, or anytime of year:

Figure out which forms you’ll need

Since everyone’s financial situation is different, there are many different tax forms that suit these different situations. If you’re unsure which tax form to use, visit the IRS’s website or consult a professional.

Keep all receipts in the same place

If you’re someone who itemizes deductions instead of standard ones, you already know how important it is to store all of your receipts together in the same place. If you lose any, it could cost you. Sort and store them throughout the year to avoid a last-minute scramble.

Store all tax returns together

Since we often have to reference the previous year’s return when preparing the current one, it’s a good idea to make sure you store them all in the same place, whether it’s a desk drawer, filing cabinet, or even a shoebox under your bed.

More: Retirement: 6 Tips for juggling retirement and college savings

More: How does a pitch for a $3,000 advance on your tax refund turn into $500?

More: How to tell if you need a human to help do your taxes

Consider filing an extension

It might seem counterintuitive to suggest an extension in a list about being prepared. However, if you file an extension and wait until later in the year, accountants will be less busy and you’ll end up filing in less time. This is also helpful for anyone experiencing any kind of stressful life event, such as those who were involved in any of the hurricanes in Texas, Florida, or Puerto Rico this year.

Review/revise your W-4

If you’ve experienced any life changes from the previous year (adding or losing any family members), ask your employer if you can review your W-4. The IRS actually recommends doing this every year.

Do your research

Are you going to prepare your taxes yourself, or are you going to hire an accountant or tax-preparation service? If you plan to do them on your own, make sure you educate yourself about the deductions you’re entitled to. If you plan to hire someone, check around and make sure they’re reputable.

Save your money

Unless you fill out the 1040EZ form and mail it in yourself, it’s going to cost you money to file your taxes. Some people are happy to pay this to ensure that they’ve done it correctly. You may also still owe taxes in addition to what you’ve already paid in. If you’ve saved for it, it shouldn’t be a problem.

Check your deductions

If you’ve had any major life events this year (bought a house, gotten married, had a child, etc.) you may be entitled to some sizable deductions. It’s a good idea to research all possible deductions to avoid overpaying your taxes.

Choose between itemized and standard deductions

Depending on what type of work you do and your financial situation, you may need to do itemized deductions, where you get credits for everything you’ve spent, rather than taking the standard deduction as dictated by your filing status. If you need to know more, consult a professional.

Track all charitable donations

Charitable donations are tax-deductible, so if you have any monthly or one-off donations, make sure to keep track so that you can deduct these expenses from your taxes.

If you’re concerned about your credit, you can check your three credit reports for free once a year. To track your credit more regularly, Credit.com’s free Credit Report Card is an easy-to-understand breakdown of your credit report information that uses letter grades — plus you get two free credit scores updated each month.

You can also carry on the conversation on our social media platforms. Like and follow us on Facebook and leave us a tweet on Twitter.

Credit.com is a USA TODAY content partner offering personal finance news and commentary. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

USA Today by John Smith Credit.com

Hot Topic: Full Employment: What Happens Now?

- By : MMEadmin

by Bondar&Associates In April 2017, the nation’s unemployment rate dropped to 4.4%, matching a 10-year low last seen in May 2007. To put this in perspective, the last time the unemployment rate fell below 4.4% was in May 2001, the

16-YEAR-OLD MADE $43,000 ON THESE STOCKS IN 3 YEARS

- By : MMEadmin

Sudarshan Sridharan may not have been old enough to drive a Tesla, but that didn’t stop him from profiting on the stock. Unlike most 16-year-olds, Sridharan manages about a quarter of a million dollars of his parents’ retirement money. It

THESE COMPANIES OFFER PAID VACATION … AND PAY FOR YOUR VACATION

- By : MMEadmin

U.S. workers have become notoriously bad about taking all their paid vacation days. But some employers have sweetened the pot to encourage their staff to not only take their time but often expand their horizons, too. Roughly 3% of employers

ELIZABETH WARREN WANTS TO RESCUE YOUR STRANDED 401(K) PLAN

- By : MMEadmin

The typical American worker stays at a job for only four years. As many find out, switching employers can wreak havoc on your retirement plan. The U.S. Government Accountability Office estimates two in five employees cash out small 401(k) balances

THE HIDDEN COST FOR STAY-AT-HOME AMERICAN PARENTS

- By : MMEadmin

Beyond lost wages, moms or dads who don’t return to work forfeit growth in those wages and in retirement and other benefits. The decision around whether to go back to work after having a baby — and pay for childcare

MEET THE 30 HIGHEST-PAID FEMALE EXECUTIVES IN THE BAY AREA 2016

- By : MMEadmin

Our annual list of the highest-paid female executives in the Bay Area shows the broad range of talent lighting up the region’s C-suites — and the big salaries that come with those positions. Check out our slideshow below of the

WILL OBAMA’S NEW OVERTIME RULES ACTUALLY HURT WORKERS?

- By : MMEadmin

A NEW FEDERAL RULE THAT EXPANDS THE NUMBER OF WORKERS ELIGIBLE FOR OVERTIME PAY MEANS EMPLOYERS WILL HAVE TO PONY UP MORE MONEY — IN PAYROLL, ADMINISTRATIVE AND LEGAL COSTS. They’re not happy. And, they warn, workers won’t be either.

WHY BUSINESS TRAVELLERS FORGET THEIR MANNERS WHEN ABROAD

- By : MMEadmin

DO PEOPLE become less considerate when they travel for business? Gulliver was mulling over this recently, after he was phoned by the PA of someone who was travelling to London and wanted to arrange a meeting. He would like to

BOEING TO CUT MORE THAN 4,500 JOBS TO REDUCE COSTS.

- By : MMEadmin

The world’s largest plane manufacturer Boeing plans to cut more than 4,500 jobs by the middle of the year to reduce costs. A company spokesman said about 1,600 positions will go through voluntary redundancies while the rest will take place

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